Séminaires et manifestations scientifiques | Actualités du Centre

Conférence Chercheure Invitée Bo Young LEE (Ph.D., D. Phil (OXON), Postdoctoral research Fellow, Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute)

Conférence Chercheure Invitée Bo Young LEE (Ph.D., D. Phil (OXON), Postdoctoral research Fellow, Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute)

9, 10 et 16 décembre 2021

 Le Centre Asie du Sud-Est (CASE), en collaboration avec l’ANR Wildsilks, a le plaisir de vous inviter à échanger avec Bo Young LEE (Ph.D., D. Phil (OXON), Postdoctoral research Fellow, Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute) à l’occasion des trois interventions suivantes 

 


Jeudi 9 décembre 2021, 13h – 13h45

 

 

Dans le cadre du séminaire commun SAD-ABI-OMICS coordonné par le Service d’Analyse des Données de l’UMS2AD, l’Atelier de Bioinformatique et le pôle OMICS de la Plateforme Analytique du MNHN.

 

 

MNHN, Service d’Analyse de Données (SAD) bât. 26, 43 rue Cuvier, 1er étage (lien visio sur demande – http://www.ums2700.mnhn.fr/analyse-de-donnees/seminaires-commun-sad-abi-omics )

 

 

Wild Silks in Archaeology: Species Identification

by Protein Mass Spectrometry and Case Studies

 

 

Silk has been a luxurious commodity throughout modern human history, and sericulture has played an important role in ancient global trade as well as technological and cultural developments. Archaeological findings suggest silks were obtained from a range of silk-producing silkworm species with regional specificity prior to domestication of the mulberry silkworm, Bombyx mori. However, investigating the origins of different silks has been technically challenging. We therefore developed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics method to analyse modern and archaeological silks and successfully differentiate Bombyx, Antheraea, and Samia produced silks down to a species level. We subsequently analysed archaeological silks and provided evidence that “wild silk” from the ancient Palmyra is derived from the Indian silkworm Antheraea mylitta. This is the first biochemical evidence supporting the production and trade of Indian wild silks in antiquity as recorded in Periplus Maris Erythraei.

 

 


 

Vendredi 10 décembre 2021, 10h30 – 12h30

 

 

Dans le cadre du séminaire d’Etienne de la Vaissière, « Globalisation archaïque » (UE 653)

 

Salle A602, EHESS, 2 cours des humanités 93300 Aubervilliers

 

 

The Development and Evolution

of Gold Silks in Central and East Asia

 

 

Gold is a precious metal signifying a material culture of the highest sophistication. In many cultures, gold has been used to decorate clothing as a sign of affluence, material wealth, and extravagance, resulting in the enhanced socio-political function of dress. The practice of gold woven textiles, generally using silks and various weaving techniques, is thought to have begun in Persia and been disseminated along the Silk Road. Nomadic peoples of Central Asia, who were known to have a fondness for precious metal products given their high value and ease of transportation, naturally embraced gold woven and gold embroidered clothing. This is clearly seen in the clothing manners of ruling class steppes people such as the Khitans, Jurchens, and Mongols, who rapidly advanced developments in gold brocade weaving after conquering the Central Plains.

 

During this lecture, we will explore the development and evolution of the art of gold textiles through different materials and production methods that emerged in Central Asia and China (representing East Asia). We will review classical literature and research papers to shed light on how different gold application techniques were integrated, and how prosperous international exchanges through the Silk Road influenced the weaving process. Some well-known archaeological samples will be discussed, along with an example of an ongoing interdisciplinary study of Yuan dynasty gold silk garments.

 


 

 

 

Jeudi 16 décembre 2021, 13h30 – 17h30

 

 

Dans le cadre du séminaire d'Annabel Vallard & Sophie Desrosiers, « Les objets comme source : les textiles et leurs matériaux II »

 

 

Séance à plusieurs voix : avec Min Sun Hwang (MMA, New York) & Annemarie Stauffer (Cologne University of Conservation Science)

 

Salle A327, EHESS, 2 cours des humanités 93300 Aubervilliers (lien de connexion BBB sur demande)

 

 

Silk: Entomology, Physicochemical Properties,

and Challenges in Archaeology

 

 

Although what we reckon as silk today is the product of Bombyx mori silkworm, the domesticated Chinese silkworm, the surviving indigenous crafts and historical records suggest various “wild silks” have also been used prior to the domestication of the B. mori

 

The first section will explain how the varieties of silks are different from each other by briefly discussing their entomology and geographical habitat and give a digest of silk cultivation and thread production. We will discuss how the materiality has affected the socio-cultural aspect of silk.

 

The second section will describe the physical and chemical properties of domesticated and non-domesticated silks from a polymer to a molecular level. This will lead to the discussion of technical challenges in investigating the origins of different silks from archaeological specimen and how to tackle them.

 

The third section will be dedicated to the archaeological interpretation of the recent analysis of Palmyra silks. The alleged wild silks were identified as silk fibres derived from the Indian silkworm Antheraea mylitta by protein mass spectrometry technique. This is the first biochemical evidence supporting the production and trade of Indian wild silks in antiquity as recorded in Periplus Maris Erythraei. A solid scientific study can bridge the gaps in archaeology and contribute to the reconstruction of the history.

Centre Asie du Sud-Est (CASE)

UMR CNRS/EHESS 8170

Campus Condorcet

2 cours des humanités

93322 Aubervilliers Cedex

tél : 33 (0)1 88 12 01 98

Métro : Ligne 12, arrêt "Front Populaire"


Coordonnées

 

Direction collégiale


Email collectif : dir.case[at]ehess.fr


Véronique Degroot

Anne-Valérie Schweyer
Annabel Vallard

 


 

Administration

 

Secrétariat général

 

 

Gestion

Olivier Merveille - olivier.merveille[at]ehess.fr

 


 Communication/Audiovisuel

 

Communication/Web/Edition

Sophie Hénon - sophie.henon[at]cnrs.fr 

 

Audiovisuel

Pierre Boccanfuso - pboccanfuso[at]yahoo.com